Attic work pt. 2

I have finished the hardest part of the attic work. I laid enough floor (2×8 OSB, cut to fit around cross-beams while kneeling in our shallow attic) to get to where the bathroom exhaust fans are. After some fruitless digging through a foot or two of insulation, I crawled out and texted April asking her to turn the fans on.

And then I crawled back in. To reach the master bathroom, it’s tighter than the crawlspace under our house. Once I’m in there, I can’t turn around, I just have to wiggle backward to get out. It’s like spelunking, but infinitely less terrifying. Except that there are electrical wires and I couldn’t turn off the electricity because I needed the damned fan to be on so I could find it.

Once it was on, I realized that I was only about 2.5 feet away from it. The rush of excitement when I cleared enough insulation for the exhaust vent to start blowing insulation was amazing.

Finding the hallway bathroom one was a bit easier–I could at least kneel over there. And it already had a duct, albeit one that is far too short and just goes into the attic. And it was covered in insulation.

But now I’ve found both, so the next steps are pretty easy:

  1. Call the roofing company to schedule a time when they can install the vent hoods. (I could do the work myself, but by paying them to install and seal, it maintains my warranty and they’ll have to handle any leaks that arise.)
  2. On the morning they’re due to arrive, I’ll go back up into the attic with the ducts (which I need to buy) and trace their circumference on the decking where I want them to connect to the hoods.
  3. Drill 8 holes on the circumference line through the decking. For each duct, I’ll leave a drill bit stuck through the decking so it pushes the shingles up and is easy to find from the top side.
  4. The roofer will pull the shingles back and I’ll cut through the roof from above with a jigsaw.
  5. Once the roofer is done installing the vent hoods, I’ll get back into the attic, attach the ducts to the hoods, and tape them.

I also need to get some insulation and seal up a section of our return vent ductwork (heating/cooling).

But all of this will have to wait a month. I leave for the Atlassian Summit conference in Las Vegas tomorrow. I’ll get back on Friday, and then four days later we’re going to Canada to visit Eric and Stephanie.

So close to done. It’ll feel really good to have this project closed out.

The Housework Continues

In a few weeks, we’re going to have a new shower installed in our master bathroom. The base of the old (fiberglass) shower had cracked through, so the subfloor may need to be replaced, and the walls were pretty bad too. So the whole thing is going to go.

As part of this, I decided to replace the exhaust fan in that bathroom. It’s a 50 CFM fan and we need at least 93 CFM based on the size of the room, so I bought a 110 CFM fan. After taking the old fan out, I found that it’s just insulation above it with no exhaust duct, and that’s bad.

Knowing that our attic is over-insulated with up to 2 feet of blown, loose fiberglass insulation, I kitted up to crawl through it, all the way to the far corner of the house, and check out what the master bathroom looked like from above. This was my first time going past the attic door, and unsurprisingly, it was quite a challenge. What I discovered was that not only is it hard to get to that spot above the master bath, but there’s nowhere in the roof suitable for venting back there. I had figured that, worst-case scenario, I could run a duct up to the ridge vent, but the ridge vent is pretty far from that fan.

So I need to install some vent hoods, but I’ll need to wait for it to stop raining first. Lowe’s doesn’t have the hoods I want, but I found them from Home Depot and ordered two. Because, of course, our other bathroom isn’t vented either, so I might as well do both at the same time.

And since this means I’m going to be crawling around the attic repeatedly, I’m also going to buy some plywood and build myself a path on top of the ceiling beams. I was able to crawl around balanced on them, but it was tricky and unnecessarily dangerous. I’d really like to not fall through the ceiling, so putting down ~20 of those boards should help a lot.

Having a plywood path will also make it easier to move around some of the insulation. There are some drifts where it’s at least 2-3 feet deep, and other areas where it’s just a few inches. Having a stable platform will make it easier to get up there with a rake or something and push it into the areas where it’s lacking.

I took a few days off this week to do the work and then recover from it, and it doesn’t look like I can get everything done. I can go ahead and put up the fan, but I need to check with our roofing company to make sure that installing the vents myself won’t void the warranty. If it would, I’ll need to hire them to do it. The hoods won’t arrive until Friday, and I’ll pick up the plywood on Saturday.

But that’s alright. Working on the house doesn’t fill me with the dread it once did. I keep doing stuff and not destroying anything, which is encouraging, and I think I’ve got a pretty decent plan that will make our attic a lot easier to work in going forward. Right now, it’s nearly impossible, but building a 2-foot wide platform all the way through (with a few offshoots over some of the rooms) will help a lot.