Why I Should Stop Doing Web Development

MAMP does make my failure come faster, at least.
MAMP does make my failure come faster, at least.

A few weeks ago, I got home one evening all jazzed up to hack the Carrington Theme on a local web server I set up on my Macbook. I had some definite ideas for how I wanted the front page to look, so I wanted to edit the theme and achieve my vision.

Three hours later, all I had to show for the effort was having cut it down to a single sidebar and moved that sidebar over a bit.

It all makes me feel pretty stupid, because I work with computers for a living and feel like I should be able to “just get” this.  After all, I’ve built numerous web servers, personal computers, and am experienced with a variety of different operating systems, programs, and web platforms. But when it comes to coding a page, once we get beyond HTML, I’m practically a goner.

That’s the main reason I began using Content Management Systems (CMS) after all. Beyond a simple, relatively ugly page, I can’t create that good a website.  I should just stick to creating the content that the management system manages.

One of my resolutions this year is to write and publish a book, and I’ve got a few other projects that will hopefully come to fruition that I’m not ready to reveal yet. I’m not going to get all this work done if I keep screwing around with stuff I’m not good at, though. If I invest all of my time and energy into something I’m not good at, like web development/design, then there’s no time/energy left for the things I can do well, IE writing what I want to write.

It has become a guiding philosophy for me in the last couple of years that one should gauge and recognize their own strengths and weaknesses, learning to get the most out of what they can do, rather than trying to exceed their limits or waste time doing things poorly. The only metaphor I have for this is in regards to fantasy fiction and wizards: a low-level wizard who knows how to use their power well will be able to apply it creatively and to great effect. In so doing, they may outperform a significantly more powerful wizard who is not creative and doesn’t use their power wisely; instead, the more powerful individual wastes their power because they don’t know how to use it, and the comparatively weaker of the two outshines them.

I can accept not being that great at something, but it means that I need to stop focusing on those projects that I just can’t do well. I’ll produce content, and if I have to someday, I’ll hire someone else to do my web development. For now, WordPress and Alex King’s contribution is good enough for me, and with the few minor tweaks I’ve made to it, it’ll manage my content just fine.

Carrington 1.3 has been released

If you pay attention to your WordPress Dashboard (I notice mine every 2-3 days), you might have seen that version 1.3 of Carrington has been released. Carrington is the theme I use for SilverPen Publishing, but it’s more than a theme: Carrington is a unique shift in theme framework development and finds itself in a significantly more advanced category than your standard WordPress theme.

Simply put, it’s all kinds of wonderful, and I’ve really enjoyed having its style represent SilverPen Publishing. However, I have had to make a few tweaks to the theme, and when faced with an upgrade, I was hesitant to recommit myself to that task. All of those changes would have to be made once again, and I didn’t take notes on what I had edited because I didn’t think I’d have to do it again any time soon, let alone with this theme.

Most theme publishers write a theme, put it out for public consumption, and leave it. I never expect upgrades of a theme unless a major change in WordPress outright breaks the theme, and even then it doesn’t get upgraded most of the time. Alex King‘s a champ, though, and stands by his work. If I could laud him any more highly I would, but for now my praise and recommendation will have to be sufficient. Such dedication caught me by surprise though, hence the lack of notes.

Because there were some important security upgrades in this version, I went ahead and upgraded after backing up my current theme, and then spent some time going through and changing what I needed to. In addition, I actually took notes this time as I went, and I’m going to go ahead and post them here. As I read in someone else’s blog recently, notes for me, notes for you.

Reasons to upgrade:

From Alex King’s blog:

Version 1.3 of Carrington Blog is now available for download.

Upgrading is strongly recommended due to a security patch in this release.

This version has a couple of changes – both bug fixes and new features:

  • Added an image.php file for displaying media. This is not yet abstracted into the framework, but will be in the future.
  • Added a field to the settings page for adding in analytics code.
  • Fixed a problem with IE7 and the dropdown menus.
  • Explicitly send headers with AJAX responses, hopefully fixes some issues reported by Safari users.
  • Added a Log In link to the header.
  • Added code to load in translations.
  • Updated documentation.

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