Originally titled, “The one thing I miss about college,” in which I mentally process while writing and reach a thought I had not begun with, and I feel overall better than I did when I started

While my classes during my undergrad weren’t great, my overall college experience had some bright points to it. I remember fondly sitting up with my suite mates all night my freshman year and playing games, and D&D over Cheezie’s pizza in that little apartment on Harrison, and spending time with the Model U.N. club, and hanging out at Potter’s House, and Bible study at FnC…

These days, I feel socially isolated. It’s not the quality of the relationships I miss, but the nature of the conversations. In college, everyone was being exposed to new ideas and they were learning at a fast pace. Conversations were tinged with a sense of discovery and excitement, and we were focused on those ideas.

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Springfield Regional NaNoWriMo Group

The group had a meeting at Border’s last Sunday, and despite my surprisingly busy schedule*, I went to meet everyone. The group functions as a source of support and ideas during the National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), but I wasn’t sure what to expect until I got there.

To be blunt, I was disappointed. It turns out that, at least in Springfield, NaNoWriMo is a source of entertainment more than anything else. The majority of the group (except one other person, I think) participates to write silly and/or outlandish things, and have no aspirations towards actually becoming novelists or anything.

There’s nothing wrong with that, but I am trying to write a serious novel, and participating in this group would distract me rather than help me. April suggested trying to form a smaller group of wannabe novelists, but I’ve decided that I’m just not interested. Going and writing with a bunch of people would probably be more distracting than anything else, so I’m not going to bother.

On top of that, I got a pretty fascist vibe from the ML (municipal liasion). I don’t think that’s his fault, though; NaNoWriMo, as an organization, is just fairly controlling of their name, events, and groups. If you’re going to participate, they want you to do it through formal channels. For instance, if I wanted to organize a “write-in,” where a number of NaNoers would meet to write, and we were going to have it in a public place (say, a coffee shop), I would have to contact the ML so he could approve and subsequently set it up. Everything has to be done by-the-books (no pun intended), and that didn’t sit right with me.

I view this event, this month, as a personal goal and means of progress. Participating in the goal of writing 50,000 words in a month is a personal thing, rather than a contest, to me. I’m not doing this just for fun (though I do intend to enjoy it), but as motivation to write and produce a novel.

I’m not here to participate in the National Piece-of-Crap Writing Month. I want to write a novel.


* I had to contact the DM of the Dungeons & Dragons group on Sunday that I’d been playing with and bow out of the game. My schedule caught up to me weeks sooner than I had anticipated, and I simply don’t have time to play until early next year. I’m quite literally booked solid until the middle of December and don’t have time for anything other than school, work, and NaNoWriMo.