It’s The Thought That Counts

This post is part of an ongoing series of collaborative conversations. See that initial post for a table of contents of all articles in the series.

I was recently having a conversation with a young photographer I know about his aspirations for having a fancy new website designed. He was looking at spending a decent amount of cash to have something really slick put together for his photo gallery, and though the company was going to charge him a reasonable rate for that level of design work and manageability (meaning that it would be easily updated by the photographer himself), I wasn’t sure spending that much money on a website was a good idea at this point in his career. Though a fancy website is nice and will help accent, present, and convey your material, it is secondary to the material itself.

This might seem a bit contradictory to my earlier post which detailed how a poor design will stymie communication, so allow me to elaborate.

I read an article several years ago that looked with great curiousity at a number of online businesses that seemed to be succeeding despite their best efforts. These businesses had ugly, poorly formatted websites with outdated modes of communication and little information about their business or product. Designed in a style I usually refer to as “Angelfire-esque” or “Geocities ghetto,” the independent owners had put together something on the web that looked similar to what a cat might produce after eating too fast. They had a product, but they had no idea how to market it on the web.

And yet, they were succeeding. They were doing business online and turning a decent profit, to the confusion of everyone else who felt that a great design was needed to make your voice heard.

When surveying their customers, the journalist discovered that the people ordering goods from these sites actually preferred the poor design. It communicated to the customer that the owner cared less about a fancy website and more about them, the customers; that they spent more time on their product than on marketing; and that the end-result was higher quality service and goods.

I would never go so far as to say that this is always the case. Rather, I tend to think that if you are a seller of repute and quality, all aspects of your business should be of similar quality, and that extends to your website. But I do think the story highlights something that a lot of people are beginning to forget: the Content is More Important than the Wrapper.

Yes, a good design will help sell your product better, and once you’ve got a good product, your next step should be a good marketing approach and/or website design.  If your product is no good, though, the fanciness of your website becomes irrelevant.

I have known numerous photographers, webcomic artists, and authors whose websites were little more than a page with a single picture and the most rudimentary of navigation, or maybe they just threw their work onto a Blogger account (note: I personally detest Blogger and highly recommend WordPress as an alternative), and yet they were remarkable successes. This is because their work was of high quality and appealed to people. The content was good, so the wrapper or site design didn’t matter as much.

And generally speaking, once you’ve got the audience and fans, things move of their own accord and you eventually get a nicer website. But no one starts at the top, and likewise it probably isn’t wise to invest like you’re already there when you’re not.

A beginning musician doesn’t buy a five-million dollar Stradivarius violin, just like a beginning photographer doesn’t learn how to shoot photos on a ten-thousand dollar camera and a beginning author usually has nothing but a pen and paper. We all have to start somewhere and learn what we’re doing. We move up to the higher quality tools as we learn how to use them most effectively. Eventually, we reach a point where our work demands a better toolset, and we adjust accordingly.

But just because you have a Stradivarius doesn’t mean you can play like a master, and just because you have spent a few thousand dollars on a site doesn’t mean you’ll instantly have a booming business. So start small and focus on the quality of your product. Your customers will be attracted by your work, and they’ll be more attracted if they know that your focus is on them, not on yourself or your site. Put your work and your fans first and the rest will fall into place.

RSS Full vs. Excerpts

Modify your WordPress Reading Settings though the Administrative interface.
Modify your WordPress Reading Settings though the Administrative interface.

RSS, short for Really Simple Syndication, is a wonderful tool that allows readers to subscribe to your content and passively pull it into an RSS reader. For the writer, this means that your content is being distributed more widely and conveniently, helping ensure that people will read what you’ve got to say. And for the reader, it makes it easier to remember to read someone’s work; you receive a notification every time they publish something.

But you don’t have to put all of your content into your RSS feed. WordPress very simply allows you to just submit a summary or excerpt from your entry into the RSS feed. I can think of a couple of reasons to do this, but truth be told, I don’t like them.

Why bother with summaries?

I think that, for most people who use summaries in their RSS feeds, the goal is to get people to come to their actual site. Maybe they have advertisements they want people to see, or they just think their site is pretty and feel that the article needs to be framed within their theme. By only providing a summary in the RSS, it lets readers know that something new is available on the site and teases them with a bit of content, encouraging them to click through to read the full article.

Part of me can sympathize with the plight of the site owner whose livelihood is based on advertisements, but I also know that it’s annoying as hell to me to have to click through and read the article on the site. Google Reader formats text much nicer than most sites do (due to line length, height, etc.), making reading more pleasurable. Having to open up Yet Another Tab is a pain, especially when you’re like me and usually have 20-30 open at a time.

The only semi-valid reason I’ve heard for RSS summaries is on sites with a lot of photos or other media. If your posts are photo-heavy, you may not want to put that bandwidth load into your RSS. It slows down people’s readers, and you don’t know that they’re always going to be on a high speed Internet connection.

But surely those people know what your site is like, else they wouldn’t have subscribed. I can’t really find a good reason to inconvenience people by only posting summaries.

Post your full articles, RSShead.

You want your stuff to be read, right? To my mind, the noblest goal is to make it as easy as possible for the reader to access your content, and the best way to do that is to post full articles into your RSS. If your site is worthwhile, people will probably visit to read additional articles or just to support you. What I’m saying is, if you don’t suck, it’ll work out. People will come, view, read, and click regardless, so there’s no point in being an inconvenient jerk.

The Evolutionary Process of Mobile Browsing on WordPress

Two Calls

My first rant, though certainly not my first try

A couple of months ago, I wrote about the trials and tribulations I had encountered and failed to overcome in regards to making WordPress a little more mobile-friendly. I’m not a coder or even a web developer/designer (though I sometimes pretend to be at work), so beyond using the tools and guides provided and tweaking some code, I’m at a loss for how to redo everything and make it work myself. Unfortunately, the tools that existed didn’t play well together and therefore didn’t serve my purposes for providing a fast site that also worked on mobile browsers.

When I wrote about my failed attempts, I learned that the coder, patrias familias, and maintainer of WP Super Cache, Donncha O Caoimhm, modified the plugin to allow mobile developers to add a filter to their code that would tell WP Super Cache to cache and serve data differently depending on certain variables, but no one quite picked up on it or modified their plugin to work in conjunction with WP Super Cache. And since WordPress almost isn’t worth running without WP Super Cache, it was sort of a wash.

A New Hope, Another Failure

As you may recall, I thought I had found a solution in the form of the WordPress Mobile plugin earlier this month, but it too failed. The problem is that you don’t just want a different stylesheet for mobile content; if that was all, there’d be no issue because WP Super Cache doesn’t cache styles, just content. But on mobile devices, you don’t have room or time to load everything, so you really only want to serve the content that is pertinent (blogrolls, for instance, might be nice, but you don’t want to have to scroll past that on a tiny mobile screen). Therefore, plugins that serve content to mobile devices also use a different theme for those devices, and when that theme gets cached, it then ends up being displayed to regular web browsers. WordPress Mobile, like all the other mobile plugins, weren’t using the filter in WP Super Cache to cache and serve their content appropriately.

Eureka! At last!

Donncha has just released version 0.9 of WP Super Cache, however, and this one takes into account user agent strings to identify mobile browsers by using the detection code from Alex King’s WordPress Mobile Edition. I began testing this on SilverPen yesterday using developmental versions of both WP Super Cache and WordPress Mobile Edition, and after identifying and working out a single bug (Donncha worked it out, of course, not me!) it appears to be working great! We ran into a snag where Safari on Mac was being identified as a mobile browser, but Donncha had that fixed before I could even get him the log files.

A new version of WordPress Mobile Edition has not yet been released, and I’m not entirely sure it needs to be. The caching and UA checks are being handled by WP Super Cache now to decide what to cache and serve, so not only should your choice of mobile plugin be irrelevant, it should also Just Work™.

Give it a try and let me know what you think!

Download WP Super Cache

Download WordPress Mobile Edition

Image by: lusi

How To Publicize your FeedBurner Feed

I’ve told you that FeedBurner is awesome, and I’ve given you some tips about how to optimize your FeedBurner Feed. Now let’s take a look at using FeedBurner to get the word out about your site, bringing more traffic to both your website and your feed.

Not Your Mother’s Marquis

Headline Animator

Remember the spinning .gifs and scrolling marquis bars across our wonderful Angelfire and Geocities web pages of the mid- to late-nineties? When I first read the words Headline Animator, my mind went to those wonderful examples of web design stupidity, but I clicked on the link anyways to see what it was. I’m glad I did.

FeedBurner’s Headline Animator is actually a way to get your article titles into places you wouldn’t normally see them. For my purposes, I created an email signature using FeedBurner’s tool, and I’ve found it to be a really good way to subtly get the word out about my website in a fresh way that people might actually use.

Under the Publicize tab inside of FeedBurner, you’ll find Headline Animator right at the top of the left column. Click on the drop down menu to see the different themes and you’ll notice that more than just email signatures are available; this tool allows you to get your headlines to a variety of different places and formats, and as you move through the wizard, you’ll get a good idea of how powerful the Headline Animator really is.

Play around with it a bit, and I’m sure you’ll find a good use for this. I will forewarn you, though, that using the email signature can sometimes be a pain. Mozilla Thunderbird can use it pretty decently, but Mac Mail certainly does not :-

Some People Like it Old-Fashioned

Email Subscriptions

For a variety of reasons (I can think of three off the top of my head), some people prefer email and web pages to RSS and readers. This being the case, it’s your job to give readers alternatives to keep them engaged with your site, and subscription by email is a good way to do this. Thankfully, FeedBurner offers a simple tool under the Publicize tab to handle this.

This will add a link to your Browser Friendly feed page, but FeedBurner’s Email Subscriptions also gives you a static link you can use anywhere to spread the emaily goodness. Let people subscribe to your content in the way that best suits them and I guarantee you’ll have more and happier subscribers than you would otherwise.

Shout it From a Mountaintop

PingShot

When you’ve written a great post, you want to let people know about it. Unfortunately, it’s a bit obnoxious to call or email everyone you know everytime you’ve written something, and besides, that’s a relatively small audience. FeedBurner invites you to spread your horizon a bit with PingShot, which notifies different web search engines so that people can find what you’ve written more quickly and easily.

While search engines might find your content eventually, you can use this to let them know right now. In addition to those pictured above, there are a couple more static options and then you can select from 5 other search engines (I also notify NewsGator, Google, Ping-o-Matic, IceRocket, Weblogs.Com, Blogdigger, Alexa, and Snap).

If you’re using WordPress, you can do roughly the same thing with Google XML Sitemaps, but not to as many different services. Using FeedBurner’s PingShot in conjunction with Google XML Sitemaps gets you the widest exposure and biggest bang-for-your-buck, so to speak, and since it’s free there’s no reason not to.

Make Sure Your RSS is Yours

Creative Commons Feed

The last option I’m going to talk about in the Publicize tab is the Creative Commons tool. Since all of my work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States license, it is free for anyone to use provided they follow the rules of that license. Though you may have copyright information on your site, it’s probably not in your feed.

As far as I’m aware, copyright over content in RSS feeds has been upheld, but I still like to put this symbol and link into my feed. I have to deal with people stealing my content on a fairly regular basis, so I always want to have something clear I can point at regarding the licensing of my work.

So Many More Options!

As you can see from the Publicize tab in FeedBurner, there are a ton more things you can do. FeedCount is one of the cooler ones, which allows you to display a little badge with how many people are subscribed to your feed, but I didn’t write about it because I just don’t use it.

Play around some with FeedBurner and I’m sure you’ll be pleased with the services it provides. Happy burning!

Why I Should Stop Doing Web Development

MAMP does make my failure come faster, at least.
MAMP does make my failure come faster, at least.

A few weeks ago, I got home one evening all jazzed up to hack the Carrington Theme on a local web server I set up on my Macbook. I had some definite ideas for how I wanted the front page to look, so I wanted to edit the theme and achieve my vision.

Three hours later, all I had to show for the effort was having cut it down to a single sidebar and moved that sidebar over a bit.

It all makes me feel pretty stupid, because I work with computers for a living and feel like I should be able to “just get” this.  After all, I’ve built numerous web servers, personal computers, and am experienced with a variety of different operating systems, programs, and web platforms. But when it comes to coding a page, once we get beyond HTML, I’m practically a goner.

That’s the main reason I began using Content Management Systems (CMS) after all. Beyond a simple, relatively ugly page, I can’t create that good a website.  I should just stick to creating the content that the management system manages.

One of my resolutions this year is to write and publish a book, and I’ve got a few other projects that will hopefully come to fruition that I’m not ready to reveal yet. I’m not going to get all this work done if I keep screwing around with stuff I’m not good at, though. If I invest all of my time and energy into something I’m not good at, like web development/design, then there’s no time/energy left for the things I can do well, IE writing what I want to write.

It has become a guiding philosophy for me in the last couple of years that one should gauge and recognize their own strengths and weaknesses, learning to get the most out of what they can do, rather than trying to exceed their limits or waste time doing things poorly. The only metaphor I have for this is in regards to fantasy fiction and wizards: a low-level wizard who knows how to use their power well will be able to apply it creatively and to great effect. In so doing, they may outperform a significantly more powerful wizard who is not creative and doesn’t use their power wisely; instead, the more powerful individual wastes their power because they don’t know how to use it, and the comparatively weaker of the two outshines them.

I can accept not being that great at something, but it means that I need to stop focusing on those projects that I just can’t do well. I’ll produce content, and if I have to someday, I’ll hire someone else to do my web development. For now, WordPress and Alex King’s contribution is good enough for me, and with the few minor tweaks I’ve made to it, it’ll manage my content just fine.

My WordPress SEO Strategy

So you’ve built your website, but now you want to know how to get people there. You’ve got a great CMS (WordPress, in my case) and you’ve heard something about the black sorcery that is Search Engine Optimization (SEO), but you aren’t really sure what to do.

No worries, because I’ve got two very easy steps for you. That is to say, they’re easy to wrap your mind around, and a LOT less ambiguous than what you’ll find on other sites. When I first started researching SEO, it seemed like no one quite wanted to get to the heart of the matter, which was a step-by-step account of what you should actually do to ensure that search engines index your site correctly.

First step: Follow this guide on Yoast’s website. You don’t have to do everything on it, but certainly give everything due consideration. For instance, I don’t use Headspace, but I absolutely use Robots Meta and Redirection. If you walk through that guide, taking his suggestions seriously and implementing most/all of them, you’ll see your traffic from searches increase.

Second step: Find topics about which no one has written… and write about them.

At face value, this seems a lot harder than it is, but you’d be amazed at how much has not been done on the Internet. I’m not going to give you a list of topics (because I’ve got big plans to start this second step myself next year), but look around for stuff that hasn’t been covered and cover it. This is what journalists do when they try to be the first to break a story. For bloggers, you don’t even need to break it open, you just have to do it right.

If you’ve ever gone looking for help online with a technical problem, be it with Windows, Adobe Photoshop, Linux, whatever, you’ve probably ended up browsing for minutes, hours, or days through myriad forums, wikis, and guides. You finally find the answers you need and figure out the problem, but now you have two options. You can move on to the next hurdle you have to jump, or you can document it.

If you are looking for help with a specific process/problem, chances are other people are too. So put together a very detailed, specific step-by-step blog post on how to do the specific thing you are trying to do, and be sure to use a boring but precisely accurate title (Using the blend tool in Adobe Photoshop to combine two landscapes, or something like that). In a lot of these cases, you’re not even doing much original writing, you’re just copying from forums/wikis/etc. (always providing citation to the original sources) and bringing everything together into one easy to find, read, and use page.

A good example of this is my post about How to Install Wrath of the Lich King on Linux. It’s not a particularly hard process, but a friend of mine was having a lot of difficulty with it. I got it installed, emailed him how to make it work, then thought I’d go ahead and throw those same instructions on my blog. To someone who has used Linux and Cedega for a while, it was relatively easy, but if this is your first go-around, it’s impossible. By providing the instructions in a simple, easy to read/use page, my traffic has increased significantly and I’ve now got a page that’s the first search result on Google for a topic.

You can do this too, just follow the two simple instructions above. 1) Optimize your WordPress setup to improve SEO, and 2) Write about stuff other people haven’t (admittedly, it helps if you’er also writing stuff that other people want to read!). Do that, and you can’t lose.

WordPress not quite ready for mobile browsing

Instead of redacting this entire entry, I’ll let you know that mobile browsing for WordPress does work now. See my updated article on The Evolutionary Process of Mobile Browsing on WordPress for more details.


One of my design goals for revision 3 of SilverPen Publishing was to make the site more accessible. I’m not a web developer by trade and didn’t really know how to do this, but I knew that I didn’t want to exclude people from visiting my corner of the web. To me, this didn’t just mean making SilverPen more friendly to screen readers and other assistive technology devices, but also to make the site work well on mobile devices.

To this end, I found yet another great plugin by Alex King that queries the user agent of the browser trying to access the site. If it’s a mobile web browser, the plugin serves up a custom template that’s very lightweight and fast to load on mobile devices. It worked very well, but unfortunately it only worked in a vaccuum, and even then had some serious repercussions.

WP Super Cache

First off, it simply does not work with WP Super Cache, and in fact, no mobile browsing solution does. For those who haven’t heard of Super Cache, I’ll explain what it does and why it’s necessary very briefly. Every blog post and page that WordPress serves up is dynamically generated on the fly when you access the site. Putting all the pieces together to make a web page puts a lot of load on the server, and it makes the page load a lot slower for you. Caching allows the server to create static pages, rather than dynamic ones, of the same content and therefore serve it up faster. This reduces load on the server and makes the page load a whole lot fast for you.

Because of how WordPress works, this caching is pretty much vital to running a site on WordPress. My traffic’s not that high yet, but it has more than doubled in the last few months, and I expect it to continue increasing at a similar rate. The last thing I need is Bluehost freezing my site temporarily due to a sudden spike of traffic, so like all good WordPress bloggers, I use WP Super Cache.

To make a long story short, WP Super Cache creates a copy of a page the first time someone visits it. Each subsequent visitor is shown that copy, and this is what breaks WordPress Mobile Edition. Since you’re viewing a static copy of the page that has already been generated, you don’t see the mobile theme, rendering the mobile plugin useless.

If it’s a choice between having the page load more quickly for most everyone and reducing the load on my server vs. having the site more accessible on mobile devices, I’m going to have to go with the former. Especially as data plans move towards 3g and faster mobile browsing.

Search Engine de-Optimization

The second reason that mobile browsing fails for WordPress is because it kills SEO, which harms your ranking in search engines. By its very nature of essentially serving a different set of pages to mobile devices, plugins such at WordPress Mobile Edition fool search engine robots into thinking there’s a second website with duplicate content on it. Such duplicate content is ranked down by search engines, which means your pages are less likely to turn up in searches and you’ll get less traffic.

The mobile plugins and solutions for WordPress all admit that it’ll kill your SEO and recommend you “do something” about it, but don’t offer many solutions. I thought I had found an elegant work-around yesterday in the form of themed multiple domains in WordPress, which would allow me to have multiple domains pointing at a single instance of WordPress, wich each domain triggering its own theme. In this instance, you can easily redirect robots that hit those other domains to a separate robots.txt file, which would tell them “don’t index this site.” For example, if I had silverpenpub.net and m.silverpenpub.net (for mobile browsers), I could have the main site indexed and tell the robots not to index the mobile site.

But I don’t want to register a separate domain for mobile browsers, and I couldn’t get it to work with a subdomain for some reason. Maybe I was doing something wrong there and will figure it out eventually, but it’s not going to happen today.

Not worth my time

In the end, trying to twist WordPress into working on mobile devices doesn’t give a  lot of return for the investment, and I’m beginning to think it will be a non-issue before too long. Even I am beginning to dream nightly of acquiring an iPhone, and browsing with a 3g connection means that, even over a cellular data plan, you can load a site quickly. And newer phones have a lot larger screens, which means that my theme displays fine all on its own.

I know that WordPress now has a iPhone-friendly administrative interface, and I hope that they include more features in the future to help their platform run better on mobile devices. Accessibility is still important to me, but I can’t justify 5-10+ hours of work to make the site more accessible to 0.5% of readers by introducing “features” that degrade or break the site for the other 99.5%.

Carrington 1.3 has been released

If you pay attention to your WordPress Dashboard (I notice mine every 2-3 days), you might have seen that version 1.3 of Carrington has been released. Carrington is the theme I use for SilverPen Publishing, but it’s more than a theme: Carrington is a unique shift in theme framework development and finds itself in a significantly more advanced category than your standard WordPress theme.

Simply put, it’s all kinds of wonderful, and I’ve really enjoyed having its style represent SilverPen Publishing. However, I have had to make a few tweaks to the theme, and when faced with an upgrade, I was hesitant to recommit myself to that task. All of those changes would have to be made once again, and I didn’t take notes on what I had edited because I didn’t think I’d have to do it again any time soon, let alone with this theme.

Most theme publishers write a theme, put it out for public consumption, and leave it. I never expect upgrades of a theme unless a major change in WordPress outright breaks the theme, and even then it doesn’t get upgraded most of the time. Alex King‘s a champ, though, and stands by his work. If I could laud him any more highly I would, but for now my praise and recommendation will have to be sufficient. Such dedication caught me by surprise though, hence the lack of notes.

Because there were some important security upgrades in this version, I went ahead and upgraded after backing up my current theme, and then spent some time going through and changing what I needed to. In addition, I actually took notes this time as I went, and I’m going to go ahead and post them here. As I read in someone else’s blog recently, notes for me, notes for you.

Reasons to upgrade:

From Alex King’s blog:

Version 1.3 of Carrington Blog is now available for download.

Upgrading is strongly recommended due to a security patch in this release.

This version has a couple of changes – both bug fixes and new features:

  • Added an image.php file for displaying media. This is not yet abstracted into the framework, but will be in the future.
  • Added a field to the settings page for adding in analytics code.
  • Fixed a problem with IE7 and the dropdown menus.
  • Explicitly send headers with AJAX responses, hopefully fixes some issues reported by Safari users.
  • Added a Log In link to the header.
  • Added code to load in translations.
  • Updated documentation.

Continue reading

Safeguarding your content: Digital Fingerprint vs. Pingbacks

If you’re a regular here at SilverPen Publishing, you’re probably already aware that I license everything under Creative Commons, so I’m not necessarily against other people using my work. There are, of course, some restrictions, namely that they can’t make money off it, they can’t change my writing, and they have to attribute the work to me. If a person wants to take an entire article and put it on their blog, so long as they aren’t running advertising, have my name on there, and link back to this site, I don’t really care.

However, I have a deep and abiding hatred for spam blogs, or splogs as they are called, that scrape my content automagically and repost it on their site. Usually, these splogs are running advertising, but what’s worse to me is that there’s no real person behind the posting. Of course, someone had to set the blog up and put the scripts into motion, but after that it’s just an automatic scanning of the blogosphere to find content, copy it, and post it on the splog as if the owner had something to do with the process. What I work hard to create and maintain, they steal with no effort at all.

Usually, splogs have a wide variety of content, though when mine gets stolen it’s often about a specific topic. If I write about World of Warcraft, my content might end up on a WoW splog that aggregates a ton of the WoW-related news on the web. Technology stuff often ends up on splogs as well. What’s nice is that they copy everything out to put on their site, and that makes it easy to track.

A tool I have used extensively is called Digital Fingerprint, which allows you to put some unique text into your RSS feed which you can then search for via Google, et. al. and see if people are reposting your feed elsewhere. I like the concept of this plugin, and I continue to use it because I feel like it’s a decent deterrent, but the truth is that it offers false security. Every time I use Digital Fingerprint to see if my content is appearing anywhere other than where it should, it turns up nothing. If DF is to be believed, my content has never been stolen.

The plugin that does inform me that my blog has been scraped is the one not directly made for this purpose, and that is Akismet. Really, though, Akismet is just how I view the notification, because what really alerts me are pingbacks. A pingback is recorded by WordPress anytime someone links to one of your blog posts or pages, provided you leave pingbacks on when you publish something (they are on by default). Since Akismet maintains a vast database of spammers, when it picks up a pingback and keeps it from being posted on my site (usually pingbacks, or trackbacks, are posted below comments on a blog entry), I know that a splog has probably scraped my content. And my content, specifically the title of every blog entry, just happens to link back to my site.

By using Akismet, I can go out to the site to verify that it’s really a splog, and at the same time I click on the IP recorded by Akismet, which runs a quick whois check. If it’s a splog, I contact their web host asking that the account be terminated because the owner is stealing content and violating copyright. In my experience, the site is usually shut down within a couple of hours.

I’ve only had about half a dozen articles stolen so far, but it’s enough to keep me on my toes and checking Akismet regularly. Thankfully, it’s not hard to tell when your content has been stolen by using this method, but I would never have known if I just relied on Digital Fingerprint. The moral of the story is to always have more than one tool in your toolbox; if you rely on just a single method, chances are that someone will find a way around that method and you’ll be left in the dark.

Mr. Fix-it Handyman

Mornings are the best time for me to write. This is clearly something I’m going to have to get over, since I only have two mornings free a week, but on those two mornings (Saturday and Sunday, in case you hadn’t caught that) I like to indulge myself. I make coffee and sit down to write for a few hours in blissful joy.

Except it hasn’t been happening lately. It seems like there’s always something that needs doing, and then I spend all morning doing it and don’t get any writing done. Yesterday, the sink/garbage disposal was backed up, and I spent two hours messing with it before getting it fixed. At that point, I wanted to take a break because I hadn’t had breakfast, we were having lunch with April’s parents in a couple of hours, and after that Emily was going to come over with her wonderful truck Stanley to cart all our recyclables to the recycling center.

I got the sink fixed, but no writing was done yesterday at all. We did finish watching Season 5 of Buffy the Vampire Slayer last night, though.

Filled with good intentions, I got up this morning (about an hour and a half before April) to write, only to discover that my website isn’t working correctly. It’s a bug I’ve encountered before where, following an upgrade to the latest version of WordPress, I can log into my main blog but not any sub-blogs (Poetry, Stormsworn, Newlyweds, etc.). Since I specifically wanted to write on the Newlyweds blog, I had to fix this.

An hour and a half later, I’ve rolled back the upgrade and gotten it working, but now it’s time to make breakfast and get ready for church. No writing accomplished. After church, we need to go grocery shopping, followed immediately by a meeting at Borders for NaNoWriMo, which will be followed immediately by D&D.

A whole weekend with no writing. It’s a good thing I didn’t organize any sort of “creativity session,” as I wouldn’t have had time to participate. It’s been a full, good weekend, but I’m sad about the lack of time to write.

I have a ton of reading to do for Buddhism (ack! test tomorrow night!!), I need to catch up on philosophy lectures, I’m trying to stay committed to my workout routine, and there just isn’t enough time. Maybe I’ll cancel on D&D tonight…

At least everything is fixed and working again. Until next time.